Contact theSOPAbout theSOPSupport theSOPWritersEditorsManaging Editors
theSOP logo
Published:December 20th, 2010 10:23 EST
Critic Says Poems About Paintings and Painters Ought to Be Shown in Museums

Critic Says Poems About Paintings and Painters Ought to Be Shown in Museums

By Djelloul (Del) Marbrook (Editor/Mentor)

They just happened to have reviewed my book

Three online projects well worth reading are Redactions: Poetry & Poetics, The Line Break and The Stoneybatter Files.

The Line Break and The Stoneybatter Files happen to have recently reviewed my second book of poems, Brushstrokes and Glances, and Redactions may carry a review in its next issue.

Aiden O`Reilly, a Dublin fiction writer, mathematician and translator, edits The Stoneybatter Files, named for a neighborhood in his hometown. This online journal is refined, thoughtful and deeply inquisitive, as befits a mathematician.

Tom Holmes, Redactions` editor and cofounder, edits an exciting, eclectic and probative journal. Both The Line Break, which refers to a poetic device, and Redactions publish poetry as well as reviews. No poet or reader of poetry should ignore them.

O`Reilly, who has asked me a number of questions in e-mail correspondence, raises a startling question in his review, startling to me, at least. Why would I regard the making of a poem as a more serious initiative than newspaper commentary, especially in view of my long career in the newspaper industry?

The easy answer is that I was never as interested in writing for newspapers as I was in editing and designing them. But the answer, while truthful, would be evasive. The truth is that poetry has always been more important to me. I wouldn`t say a higher calling, but it has always been my calling. Newspapers were a way to make a living, poetry was a way to live.

Holmes, whose review instructs me in my own work, writes that he would like to see the poems about paintings and painters hanging next to paintings in a museum. I, too, would like to see poems in public places, on wi-fi screens in parks, embedded in cornerstones and paving stones, anywhere. And I would like to see the historic connection between poets and painters celebrated. They inform each other in a unique way, a way I`m not sure I fully understand.

My work has been fortunate to find people like Holmes, O`Reilly, Michael Roy Meyerhofer, Barbara Louise Ungar, Deborah Poe, Susanna Roxman and others who have written about it with great care and respect. It`s as lovely as having grown up in a loving family.

Djelloul Marbrook is a retired newspaperman. His second book of poems, Brushstrokes and Glances, will be published by Deerbrook Editions on December 20, 2010. His first book of poems, Far From Algiers, won the Stan and Tom Wick Poetry Prize from Kent State University in 2007 and was published in 2008. It won the International Book Award in 2010. His novella, Artemisia`s Wolf, will be published by Prakash Books of India in December. His novella, Saraceno, was recently published as an e-book. His story, Artists Hill, adapted from the second novel of an unpublished trilogy, won the Literal Latté first prize in fiction in 2008. The pioneering e-book publisher, Online Originals (UK), published his novella, Alice MIller`s Room, in 1999.

Del`s book, Far From Algiers: http://upress.kent.edu/books/Marbrook_D.htm

New review of Far from Algiers: http://www.rattle.com/blog/2009/05/far-from-algiers-by-djelloul-marbrook/

Artists Hill, Literal Latté`s fiction first prize: http://www.literal-latte.com/author/djelloulmarbrook/

His blog: http://www.djelloulmarbrook.com

His mother`s art: http://www.juanitaguccione.com

His aunt`s art: http://www.irenericepereira.com