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Published:June 28th, 2011 12:14 EST
Project Connects Japanese and Haitian Children Suffering From Post-Trauma

Project Connects Japanese and Haitian Children Suffering From Post-Trauma

By SOP newswire2

Delegation Going to Haiti Kick-Off Event June 28th noon-2 pm  

In the aftermath of the recent tsunami   and earthquake in Japan and the earthquake in Haiti, thousands of children in   those countries still suffer either directly from loss of parents and homes or   indirectly from fears of what could recur. To comfort these youth, the Global   Kids Connect project is organizing groups of children in each country to   exchange plush dolls to offer messages of comfort and caring.    

WHAT:   A kick-off event before the Global Kids Connect team leaves for Haiti to deliver the dolls, to be held in   New York City   at the offices of HappyDoll, Inc.

WHERE:  2075 Broadway between 72-73rd Streets Suite 506. 

WHEN:  Tuesday, June 28th  noon-2 pm. 

At the event, the Global Kids Connect Project will be described and children representing the countries (Haiti, Japan and America) in the project will demonstrate the   construction of the HappyDolls which will be taken to Haiti two days   thereafter.       

WHO:    The partners in the project are: Dr. Judy Kuriansky   (www.DrJudy.com), a noted clinical psychologist who has done   psychological first aide for survivors of many disasters, including 9/11,   Hurricane Katrina, the Asian tsunami and earthquakes in China and Haiti. She is also the main United   Nations NGO representative of the International Association of Applied   Psychology (IAAP) and an adjunct at Columbia University Teachers   College. She developed psychological first aid   projects in post-earthquake Haiti and has spent years doing projects in   Japan.  Nozomi Terao, formerly of Morgan   Stanley, is founder and Executive Director of HappyDoll Inc. (www.Happydoll.org). Russell Daisey is an internationally known   composer and co-founder of the Stand Up for Peace Project (www.towersoflightsong.com). Father Wismick Jean Charles, a Haitian   Catholic priest, is a UN NGO representative for IAAP. AHNU, Haiti   Action for the United Nations, located in Haiti, is an NGO dedicated to enhancing the education of Haitian youth, as well as   promoting the culture of Haiti, the importance of the UN system and more   involvement of Haiti in the UN.    

Global Kids Connect is a joint project of  IAAP, an NGO accredited at the United   Nations; HappyDoll Inc., an organization founded in January, 2011 and which   has since run projects for orphans and other children in Japan   post-tsunami/earthquake; Centre Bon Samaritan in Haiti, and The Stand Up For Peace   Project.     

Kuriansky explains that The project is based on   sound psychological principles applied in other disasters, for example after   9/11 when teddy bears and greeting cards were sent to children in New York, to offer   security and safety. Having the doll come from another country makes the child   feel cared for and connected, that helps healing.    

Nozomi Terao, who organized the doll making in   Japan, observes, There was   happiness on the Japanese children`s faces, a look of mystery about where the   dolls were going next, the feeling of understanding that they were making   something that would go across the world, to strangers.  They knew that they were helping other children far away, in Haiti.  

The GKC team is traveling to Haiti June 30th   to conduct an event where 100 children in Haiti will receive dolls made in   Japan and America, and will make another 100 dolls that will be returned to   Japanese and American children.    Father Wismick Jean Charles is coordinating the event on the ground in   Port-au-Prince. The event will include (1)   the doll-making giving and receiving; (2) relaxation exercises designed by   Kuriansky, to ease symptoms like headaches and stomach aches from which youth   are still suffering after that disaster, and (3) a celebration consisting of   songs in Creole, Japanese and English, taught by the Stand Up for Peace   Project`s Kuriansky and Daisey.    

The dolls are made of muslin, stuffed with cotton, and   decorated with colored magic markers and names of the doll and its maker.   New York children from a public school in   New York City were involved in the project`s   first stage, which occurred six months after the Haiti   earthquake.  At that time,   children learned and performed in concert a Creole healing song, and drew   greeting cards delivered to Haiti children.    

RSVP necessary:  contact: Becky Houran at Bhouran@gmail.com

Or phone: 603   520-5941