Contact theSOPAbout theSOPSupport theSOPWritersEditorsManaging Editors
theSOP logo
Published:February 8th, 2012 13:55 EST
Job Searching in the New Economy

Job Searching in the New Economy

By SOP newswire2

Gender Differences and Gen-Y on Networking

Survey Overview:

The majority of this sample (total=2043 participants) is comprised of individuals who are in transition or unemployed (38.9%), followed by those who are employed full-time (32.3%), employed and actively seeking another job " (15.7%), and currently employed part-time (10.5%). The sample was nearly evenly split between men (47%) and women (53%).

The age composition of sample:

·         Boomers (ages 47 and 65) - 37.5%

·         Gen X (ages 31-46) - 36.3%

·         Gen Y (18 to 30) - 25.1%

Highlighted Findings (all findings reported are statistically significant):

Overall, the survey points to the fact that job seekers, in general, are expending too much energy on passive job search activities like surfing job boards and not focusing enough on building their referral networks both on and off-line. These results speak to the need to change the mindset of job seekers when it comes to job searching and networking online. In particular, both female and Gen Y job seekers need to focus more on leveraging the power of social media as a competitive advantage in the job hunt. Three major findings are:

1)      Men are More Proactive Networkers than Women Both On and Off-line

 

2)      Gen Y are More Reluctant to use Social Media for Job Search than Gen X/Boomer Counterparts

 

3)      Job Seekers Are Not Taking Advantage of Social Media in Job Searching

 

Detail Findings

1)      Men are More Proactive Networkers than Women Both On and Off-line

On average, men were significantly more proactive in reaching out to professional contacts than women. Specifically, men were more proactive in (all statistically significant):

·         Phoning & e-mailing colleagues & professional contacts (Men = 5.45 contacts, Women = 4.21 contacts

·         Reaching out to current colleagues & professional contacts via social media (Men = 5.12 contacts, Women= 4.38 contacts)

·         Making new professional contacts via social media (Men = 6.48 contacts, Women = 5.70 contacts).

 

2)      Gen Y are More Reluctant to use Social Media for Job Search than Gen X/Boomer Counterparts

Those classified as Generation X (31 to 46) and Baby Boomers (47 to 65) each use social media significantly more than their Generation Y (18 to 30) counterparts for job searching/networking.

·         Unemployed are Still Too Focused on Job Boards: The majority of Gen Y job seekers (56.9%) spend most of their job search/networking time on job boards

·         Gen Y More Reluctant to use Social Media: Gen Y spend significantly less time (Avg hrs/week = 5.34) using social media to job search/network than any other age group (Avg hrs/wk Gen X= 6.23, Gen Y = 7.88).

·         Gen Y Reach Out Less: Gen Y have reached out to significantly less personal/professional contacts (Avg contacts = 3) and made significantly less new professional contacts (Avg contacts = 4.7) in the last month than any other age group. Their counterparts have reached out to an average of 5 contacts, and have made an average of 6 new contacts.

 

3)      Job Seekers aren`t Taking Advantage of Social Media in Job Searching

The majority of respondents: surf job boards (50.6%) and use social media (Facebook, Twitter) (28.6%) to search for jobs/network, and use LinkedIn (74.4%) for job searching and professional networking.

·         LinkedIn Still Tops the List: All age groups use LinkedIn significantly more than Twitter or Facebook for job searching and professional networking (64.9% of Gen Y, 74.8% of Gen X, and 80.7% of Boomers).

·         Job Seekers aren`t Networking: Most of the individuals (53.8%) that are in transition or unemployed are spending their job search/networking time surfing job boards rather than using social media, reaching out to personal contacts, or attending networking events and job fairs. There are significantly more full-time employed individuals (39.5%) using social media to job search/network than any other employment status group (i.e., unemployed, employed part-time, employed and looking for another job). 

·         Unemployed Need to be More Proactive: Those that are employed full-time have made about the same number of new professional connections via Social Media in the last month as those that are in transition or unemployed (Avg full-time = 6.23, Avg unemployed = 6.19).

Side notes: The most important factor in selecting a job/career for each age group is as follows:

·         Gen Y = Opportunity for promotion

·         Gen X = Flexibility

·         Boomer = Job Security and Location/Commute.

Judyth Piazza chats with Michael `Dr. Woody` Woodward, PhD ...