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Published:February 7th, 2007 05:25 EST
Review of Art Garfunkel's

Review of Art Garfunkel's "Some Enchanted Evening"

By Maria Grella

Art Garfunkel, once part of folk power duo, Simon & Garfunkel, has put out a collection of American standards in "Some Enchanted Evening".  The first track sets the tone of the entire album, and puts the listener in a calm and restful place.  Unfortunately, Garfunkel's vocals aren't what they used to be, which he tries to make up for by the relaxing feel.

 

"I Remember You" begins with a light and breezy quality, with the start coming off a little shaky.  "Someone To Watch Over Me", a song that is beautiful to begin with, succeeds in having the pure and simple sentiment required of the lyrics.  "Let's Fall In Love" is a mix of a folksy sound with early jazz.  "I'm Glad There Is You" again has light and airy vocals.  "Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars" has the opposite effect, where the vocals are not as smooth as they could be, which would have added to the song.  Despite this, there is a swaying island image that comes to mind listening to this song, easing the listener to relax. 

 

"Easy Living" is easily forgettable.  "I've Grown Accostumed To Her Face" doesn't show much range and is an odd song.  "You Stepped Out Of A Dream" continues the 'sipping a pina colada while walking in the sand' image.  "Life Is But A Dream" is more like a nightmare, though Garfunkel mixes it up a bit by hitting a high note at song's end, breaking the monotony of the record.  "Some Enchanted Evening" decreases in value by altering the original tune.  "It Could Happen To You" sees the return to the breezy vibe, which may appear to be overkill at this point.  "What'll I Do Listen" is another forgettable track.  "If I Loved You" is the last and slowest tempoed tune on the album.

 

Following in his peers' footsteps, (Rod Stewart and Barry Manilow), Garfunkel did his take on mostly American standards to put forth "Some Enchanted Evening".  Though in theory it may have seemed like a profitable and good idea at the time, in reality his vocals cannot carry most of these songs to full capacity, leaving the potential unattained.  The same trouble follows Stewart, who unlike Manilow, doesn't have the vocal chops to emote these songs the way they should.

 

Fans of Art Garfunkel will probably enjoy this album, and truth be told, there is a calming, peacefulness surrounding the music.  Casual fans, or those looking for a romantic compilation, may want to pass on "Some Enchanted Evening".