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Published:November 23rd, 2009 22:04 EST
Eid al-Adha

Happy Eid al-Adha

By SOP newswire2

Best Buy stands by its decision to wish U.S. Muslims a Happy Eid Al-Adha, a rep for the company said, and though some Best Buy customers took offense, a Muslim advocacy group praised the move.

The retailer got some flak this week for including, along with its circular advertising Thanksgiving Day sales, a note saying "Happy Eid Al-Adha," which refers to a holiday of sacrifice for followers of Islam on Nov. 27 this year. After TechCrunch ran an item about the circular, some claimed offense and said they`d take their business elsewhere. "I spent about $3,000 with . . . your store. I will be shopping somewhere else," one consumer wrote on Best Buy`s Web forum. "BB has the Muslims covered with the `Happy Eid,` but what about the rest of us Americans?" wrote another. "Do we get a `Happy Thanksgiving`?"

 Eid al-Adha

(The American Family Association, a Christian advocacy group, has singled out Best Buy for using "Happy Holidays" instead of "Merry Christmas." A Best Buy rep, however, didn`t agree with the claim, saying: "You will see more of Christmas in our holiday messaging. Christmas will be included in our insert and online. We have `Merry Christmas` on our gift cards, too. In addition. we have developed the Christmas Morning simulator as an online interactive game.")

Not everyone was dismissive. "Stop with the hatin` and happy Eid," wrote one TechCrunch commentor. "For every anti-BB post, I`m going to spend $1 there," wrote another.

Best Buy rep Lisa Svac Hawks explained the thought behind the greeting: "Best Buy`s customers and employees around the world represent a variety
of faiths and denominations. We respect that diversity and choose to greet our customers and employees in ways that reflect their traditions," she said.

Ahmed Rehab, a spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said he could not recall when any American retailer mentioned the holiday in its ads. "It makes perfect business sense to acknowledge and celebrate a holiday that one out of four people celebrate," Rehab said.