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Published:July 21st, 2006 12:01 EST
Joint Statement by the United States and Brazil on Scientific and Technological Cooperation

Joint Statement by the United States and Brazil on Scientific and Technological Cooperation

By SOP newswire

On July 21, 2006, the first Joint Commission Meeting on Scientific and Technological Cooperation between the United States and Brazil was held in Washington . White House Science Adviser, Dr. John H. Marburger III, led the 48-member U.S. delegation. The 27-member Brazilian delegation was headed by Deputy Minister of Science and Technology (MCT) Dr. Luis Manuel Rebelo Fernandes.

The meeting included delegates representing ministries and agencies involved with science and technology in each of the two nations. The Joint Commission Meeting took place in accordance with the 1984 Agreement on Science and Technology Cooperation between the United States and Brazil (amended and extended in 1994) and as directed by Presidents Bush and Lula in the joint statement issued when they met in November 2005 in Brasilia .

On that occasion, the Presidents “committed to intensify existing dialogues and cooperation in science and technology, education, the environment, and promotion of trade and investment.” Their decision to “reinvigorate medium and long term activities in areas such as earth, atmospheric and space sciences, health, biodiversity and agriculture” provided the impetus for this meeting of the Joint Commission.

In preparation for this meeting, a bilateral workshop was held April 24-26 in Rio de Janeiro , covering biomedical research, public health, earth observation, technology and measurement standards, earth sciences, information and communication technologies, education and exchanges, and other areas.

The Joint Commission reviewed ongoing scientific and technological cooperation between the two nations, and noted the significant contributions this work has made to advance scientific research, to establish working contacts between scientists, and to provide tangible benefits to society. These benefits, it was observed, were not limited to Brazil and the United States , but extended to other countries as well.

Collaboration by both countries has advanced understanding of the earth's climate, improved weather forecasting, enhanced coordination to address infectious diseases, conformed metrology standards, and contributed to basic scientific research in a range of fields.

The United States and Brazil agreed to explore ways to build on existing programs, promote workshops on a number of issues, and discuss new areas for enhanced cooperation. Potential areas include information and communications technology, bioinformatics, agriculture, energy, public health, and earth observation. The two sides agreed to hold further technical meetings to explore these areas.

Both sides agreed that the convening of this very first Joint Commission Meeting on Scientific and Technological Cooperation opens up a new and promising chapter in the dialogue and cooperation between the two countries.

 

Source: DoS