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Published:September 16th, 2007 10:35 EST
The man accused by British prosecutors of being behind the murder of Aleksandr Litvinenko

The man accused by British prosecutors of being behind the murder of Aleksandr Litvinenko

By SOP newswire

The man accused by British prosecutors of being behind the murder of Aleksandr Litvinenko says he will run in the forthcoming Parliamentary elections in Russia. Speaking exclusively to Russia Today, Andrey Lugovoy said he originally had no desire to go in to politics, but changed his mind after becoming the centre of a diplomatic row between London and Moscow.

“Firstly, I would like to confirm the words of the Liberal Democrat Party leader, Vladimir Zhirinovsky, who said I will take part in the election campaign as number two,” Andrey Lugovoy stated.

”Secondly, I will attend the party gathering tomorrow in Moscow. This is where the party candidates are to be approved,” Mr Lugovoy confirmed before going on to say: “I have been involved in politics over the past three months against my wishes. I was a businessman, but no longer, thanks to the disgusting policy of British prosecutors which led to this political hysteria. With the situation being highly politicised by British opponents, I find myself in the midst of a political wave of interest in me.”

Russia's Liberal Democrats said Andrey Lugovoy is to represent them in December's parliamentary elections.

“I head the party election list. Andrey Lugovoy will be number two. He is a victim. He came under attack from British intelligence,” said Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the party’s leader.

If Lugovoy is elected to Parliament, he would automatically become immune to prosecution.

Meanwhile, Lugovoy has started legal proceedings against Russian newspaper Kommersant over an article linking him with the murder of Aleksandr Litvinenko. In an article, entitled "Boris Berezovsky has been enrolled as a spy", when talking about Lugovoy the paper described Litvinenko as his victim.

Lugovoy says this is libellous and is seeking 20 MLN rubles (more than $US 700,000 ) in compensation and for the statement to be retracted. A court will consider the allegations next week.

The editor-in-chief of Kommersant admits that the newspaper used incorrect wording in referring to the Russian businessman Andrey Lugovoy in the article.

Source:Russia Today