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Published:August 30th, 2010 10:33 EST

Staying Healthy by Eating Grapes and Acorn Squash

By SOP newswire2

 In response to growing interest from Moms nationwide, Fruits & Veggies-More Matters® showcases tips and recipes featuring a different fruit and vegetable each month.  Survey results show that 90 percent of Moms say it is important to include fruits and vegetables in their family meals, and more than 75 percent are interested in learning how to prepare them in new ways. Moms can find these helpful and easy-to-use tips and recipes each month at www.FruitsandVeggiesMoreMatters.org. Grapes and Acorn Squash are the Fruit & Veggie of the Month for September 2010. 
 
Grapes
The Concord grape is the only variety native to North America.  All other varieties grown here were started from imported vines.
    
To see a video about selecting Grapes online, click here, or go to http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/video/VideoCenter.php?Auto=1&start=0&Video=83&SuperSubID=68.           
 
Select:  Choose plump, firm grapes that are firmly attached to the stem. 
Store:  Store grapes in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
Nutrition Benefits:  Fat free; saturated fat free; very low sodium; cholesterol free. 
Eat:  Grapes and Grains is a delicious way to add more fiber to your diet. This recipe meets the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention`s (CDC) strict nutrition guidelines as a healthy recipe.
 
Grapes and Grains
Preparation time: 45 minutes
Serves: 4
Cups of Fruits and Vegetables per Serving: 1/2
 
Ingredients:
2 tablespoons Olive oil or other vegetable oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 tablespoon orange juice
2 cups cooked barley (do not overcook)
1 ½ cups seedless or halved, seeded grapes
½ cup sliced celery
¼ cup sliced green onion
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper

In mixing bowl, whisk together oil, lemon and orange juices. Add barley, grapes, celery, and onions, tossing to coat. Season with salt and pepper; chill until serving time. 
 
 
Acorn Squash 
Acorn squash is a type of winter squash that was named for its acorn-like shape. Acorn squash come in a variety of colors including: yellow, dark green, tan, and orange.  
Select:  Choose acorn squash that are dull and heavy for their size. Avoid squash with soft spots or cracks.
Store:  Store acorn squash in a cool, dry area away from extreme temperatures and sunlight. Acorn squash can stay fresh for up to 3 months.
Nutrition Benefits:  Cholesterol free, fat free, excellent source of vitamins A and C. Also a good source of potassium, calcium, magnesium, folate, and fiber.
Eat:  Apple Stuffed Acorn Squash is a great recipe that can be used as a side dish or a main dish. This recipe meets the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention`s (CDC) strict nutrition guidelines as a healthy recipe.
 
Apple Stuffed Acorn Squash
Preparation time:  30 minutes
Serves: 4
Cups of Fruits and Vegetables per Serving:  1/2
 
Ingredients:  
¼ cup raisins
2 acorn squash (about 4" diameter)
8 seconds butter-flavor cooking oil spray
2 tablespoons sucralose no-calorie sweetener
¼ teaspoon cinnamon
2 medium Fuji Apples
2 tablespoons light butter
 
Cover raisins with warm water and soak for 20 minutes, then drain.  While soaking, pre-heat oven to 375°F. Cut acorn squash into quarters and remove the seeds. Spray the inside of each squash quarter with one second of cooking oil spray. Mix sweetener and cinnamon together. Sprinkle squash quarters with ½ of cinnamon mixture. Bake for 10 minutes. While baking, cut apples into quarters and remove the core. Chop apples into ½" pieces. Melt butter in a sauce pan over medium heat. Add apples, raisins and remaining cinnamon mixture. Mix well and remove from heat. Take squash from the oven and top with equal amounts of apple mixture, making sure to scrape sauce pan well. Squash needs all the melted butter to stay moist as it bakes. Return squash to the oven and cook for 30-35 minutes or until apples and squash are tender. Serve warm.
 
Find these recipes and more on the Fruits & Veggies-More Matters Web site, www.FruitsandVeggiesMoreMatters.org. Fruits & Veggies-More Matters is a national public health initiative created to encourage Americans to eat more fruits and vegetables-fresh, frozen, canned, dried and 100 percent juice.  One way Fruits & Veggies-More Matters helps consumers eat healthy is by putting its logo on the packaging of certain food products. In order to carry the Fruits & Veggies-More Matters logo, food products must meet strict nutrition guidelines for total fat, saturated fat, trans-fat, fiber, added sugar, and sodium content. Consumerscan look for the Fruits & Veggies-More Matters logo when shopping as an indication that a product is nutritious and to remind them to eat more fruits and vegetables for their better health. 
  
 
 
About Produce for Better Health Foundation

Produce for Better Health Foundation(PBH) is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) fruit and vegetable education foundation.  Since 1991, PBH has been working hard to motivate people to eat more fruits and vegetables to improve public health.  PBH achieves success through industry and government collaboration, first with the 5 A Day program and now with the Fruits & Veggies-More Matters public health initiative.  Fruits & Veggies-More Matters is the nation`s largest public-private, fruit and vegetable nutrition education initiative with Fruit and Vegetable Nutrition Coordinators in each state, territory and the military.Produce for Better Health Foundation (PBH) is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) fruit and vegetable education foundation. Since 1991, PBH has been working hard to motivate people to eat more fruits and vegetables to improve public health.  PBH achieves success through industry and government collaboration, first with the 5 A Day program and now with the Fruits & Veggies-More Matters public health initiative.  Fruits & Veggies-More Matters is the nation`s largest public-private, fruit and vegetable nutrition education initiative with Fruit and Vegetable Nutrition Coordinators in each state, territory and the military.
 
 
PBH is also a member and co-chair with Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) of the National Fruit & Vegetable Alliance (NFVA), consisting of government agencies, non-profit organizations, and industry working to collaboratively and synergistically achieve increased nationwide access and demand for all forms off fruits and vegetables for improved public health.  To learn more, visit
www.pbhfoundation.org and www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org