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Published:June 24th, 2008 10:17 EST
Cyber Schools Coming Soon

Cyber Schools Coming Soon

By SOP newswire2

The Michigan Department of Education plans to fund ten schools using Federal Technology funds to become Cyber Schools across the State of Michigan to determine if they can increase our graduation rate.

CYBER SCHOOLSWhat are Cyber Schools? Will they change the face of education? Will they benefit you, your child or your business? But more importantly, can they jumpstart the Michigan economy?

Those questions and more will be answered at the forum, CYBER SCHOOLS: Can They Jumpstart the Michigan Economy? to be held Thursday June 26, 2008 8:30 am at Automation Alley 2675 Bellingham Troy Mi. Keynote speaker will be Dr. Yong Zhao of MSU Confucius Institute - a collaboration with China Central Radio and TV University followed by a facilitated discussion moderated by Carol Cain of Michigan Matters.

Ida Byrd-Hill, President of Uplift, Inc. a 501 (c) 3 Idea Incubator and author of Breakin` Out of Your Financial Funk!, has been championing the CYBER SCHOOL cause after the closure of Hustle & TECHknow Preparatory High School November 2007. Hustle & TECHknow preparatory High School was a cyber school catering to high school dropouts that achieved this success:

: Won Educational Program of the Year Automation Alley 2007

: Collective Lexile reading scores moved from 4.2 grade to 7.8 grade in one year.

: Three students qualified as the 79 quarter finalists for the National Vocabulary Championship out of 10,000 student participants

: Three teams participated in the Thinkquest Website design competition


: Inaugural graduation rate 80% June 2007

Imagine the reduction of high school dropouts that occur annually.
"Michigan`s 40,000 students who were supposed to graduate in the class of 2007 but instead dropped out will cost the state about $12.3 billion in lost wages", said Bob Wise, former governor of West Virginia. Wise, who is now the president of the Washington, D.C.-based Alliance for Excellent Education, said the dropouts would also cost the state $2.2 billion in household wealth, $750 million in health care costs and $126 million in remedial training costs.

Ida Byrd-Hill believes the mastery of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematical (STEM) will allow "the forgotten students" to rise out of poverty just as these skills have allowed professionals from Asia, Eastern Europe and Africa to rise out of poverty.

Be on the ground floor of a major paradigm shift, join Ida Byrd-Hill at the forum CYBER SCHOOLS: Can They Jumpstart the Michigan Economy? to be held Thursday June 26, 2008 8:30 am at Automation Alley 2675 Bellingham Troy MI.

Register for the forum at
www.upliftinc.org